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July 07, 2007

NEW RELEASE 1. Temporary Worker Visas and Wage Pressure 2. Immigration and Unemployment in Georgia

The Immigration Policy Center (IPC) at the American Immigration Law Foundation (AILF) has assembled a team of professionals to analyze the accuracy of the assumptions and perceptions that shape the public debate over immigration, with the goal of reducing the level of deception and confusion in the debate. Today IPC is releasing two "Immigration Fact-Check" memos covering current issues in the federal immigration debate. Both are summarized below and the full text of each is available on the IPC website at www.immigrationpolicy.org and via the links below.

1. Temporary Worker Visas and Wage Pressure

The debate over how many immigrants should be permitted to enter the country each year under a new temporary worker program is clouded by a common misconception: that the greater the number of temporary workers admitted, the greater the downward pressure on the wages of native-born workers. However, this assumption is not supported by the facts.

Read the full text here at http://www.ailf.org/ipc/factchecks/TempVisas.pdf

2. Immigration and Unemployment in Georgia

A report by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) argues that the increase in the number of less-educated immigrant workers in Georgia between 2000 and 2006 caused employment levels among less-educated natives to decline. However, there is no evidence of a direct, negative relationship between employment levels for immigrants and natives in Georgia. Instead, evidence suggests that immigration has had generally positive effects for most native-born workers and that employment levels among less-educated natives have declined for reasons unrelated to immigration.

Read the full text here at http://www.ailf.org/ipc/factchecks/Georgia.pdf

Posted by VisaLawyer at July 7, 2007 09:12 AM

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